Pretentious Cock

Ever read something written by someone that is so chock full of hubris it makes you want to laugh while giving them the finger?

My dad had a phrase for people like that; he’d say they’re talking like a person with a paper asshole. I never quite understood what that meant, until it dawned on me. He was saying the same thing as describing a person who’s shit doesn’t stink, or in this case doesn’t leave skid marks, and is as delicate as paper. It takes a highly educated person to be that stupid.

Enter this dumbass.

Author of the article in The Federalist David Harsanyi wrote a piece (its a real piece, alright) entitled, “America, Please Stop Glorifying Manufacturing Jobs.” I just found this this morning shortly before publishing the last blog post. I’ll repost here, in red ink, my thoughts scattered about in blue.

During every election season, populists in both parties offer some variation of this cliché about American manufacturing: “We don’t make anything anymore.” That’s cause its true.

“We” still make plenty of things, actually. Notice how he doesn’t mention any of them, just says there are plenty. Right. There are manufacturing jobs available (some of them high paying, specialized, and, no doubt, rewarding). They must be so specialized that they are a secret; anyone heard of the high-paying, specialized, rewarding manufacturing jobs in USA? Maybe in the 1940’s and ’50s. And there may well be new, unexpected, and astonishing things to build in the not-so-distant future. I’ll agree, within 10 years we went from dial up internet to internet capability in our phones in our pockets.

But still, it’s worth pointing out that manufacturing isn’t the same as manufacturing jobs. And it’s really time we stop venerating both. Wait, what? Are you that dumb or am I hard of reading?

Here’s GOP frontrunner Donald Trump the other day grumbling about having to buy thousands of televisions manufactured in South Korea and then wondering why the United States would defend a nation that sells these reasonably priced products. (I own two Samsung televisions, and I can’t think of a better reason to defend South Korea): National Defense and Foreign Policy is strongly linked to economics, but economy alone is not a good enough reason to necessarily crawl into bed with someone. I like South Korea plenty, and their products, but just because I love oil and the shit I can use it for doesn’t have me standing in line to go protect OPEC nations. Quite the contrary.

“I don’t think anybody makes television sets in the United States anymore. We don’t make anything anymore.” – Donald Trump He’s right, no television has been manufactured in the US since the late 90’s when Phillips began to end their TV production. 

Similarly, Bernie SandersBarack ObamaMike HuckabeeRick SantorumJeb Bush, Marco Rubio, and Hillary Clinton have, to one extent or another, lamented the shrinking of the American manufacturing base and threatened our economic well-being by promising to bring those jobs “back.” It’s a bad idea. Only difference is, of all the aforementioned people, not one has ever so much as owned a lemonade stand, let alone created a job. How would you “bring back” what you never had in the first place?

For starters, isn’t it a bit archaic to act like assembling a car is more honorable or useful than being a teacher, a lawyer, an entrepreneur, or an engineer; working in finance; or making a living in the service industry? More honorable, maybe not, but certainly a necessary one. Economics is driven more off of supply and demand than the nobility of a profession. And last I checked, any job on the list qualified as more honorable than a lawyer. It depends on what they’re teaching and what service they’re providing as to its usefulness more or less compared to building cars. One thing right off the bat though, by this young little fuck comparing one man’s trade and sense of honor against another is that he is low class and hasn’t ever worked in one of the said trades. Working people don’t pit against each other like that. Perhaps there’s something about the tangibility of seeing a widget being put together by a line of workers that offers voters some affirmation that, indeed, things must be going well. But it doesn’t work that way. No, its something about the tangibility of seeing a paycheck feed a family and pay the bills. Its the tangibility of being able to call a place about a warranty part or repair and not having to press 1 to speak to someone in english, only after waiting 45 minutes through automated answering machine. Its seeing a product, good, or service, that you had a hand in making that offers the affirmation of a job well done. Unfortunately, young man, it is the kind of feeling only callouses and sweat and long hours can understand. Yes, it does work that way. 

It’s not only about the quantity of jobs that politicians promise to bring back, but the quality of those jobs. Well, when you get pink slipped and have to pay bills, suddenly quality takes a back seat to quantity. Meaning, when I’m hungry, I’ll worry about how nice the fuckin job is later. For right now, I need to bump the quantity up to 1 then I’ll start thinking about the quality. Often times, better paying jobs are attained and great experience is gotten by shit jobs starting our. Work ethic is too, which is a wonderful character evaluation when the boss is looking to fill a position you didn’t even know was coming. Most “lost” manufacturing jobs do not entail high levels of craftsmanship or the use of great innovation. Probably right, but again I denounce the belittling of any work as inferior. You’re not ‘working with your hands’ in any meaningful sense. Only a selfish spoiled brat would have the hubris to pretend he could tell you what defines a “meaningful sense.” There is no shame in labor, but low-value, low-wage jobs requiring intensive and repetitive labor isn’t exactly the kind we should be clamoring to save. Perhaps not, but it is not what we save, but what the market demands. Who wants to play in other people’s fecal matter and refuse all day? Plumbers and Waste Management Employees who are well-compensated for their work. Farming involves a lot of seeming low value, low-wage jobs requiring just such intensive labor. The fact that people like you exist in droves with your highly educated non-informed opinion is why our immigration rate from hispanic countries who don’t feel above any work is through the roof and causing problems. Its a foot in the door, dumbass, not a tenure track. It truly is a way to begin climbing the ladder, but when you’re like this guy, you expect a cherry-picker to haul your ass from the graduation stage to the top of the ladder. Sorry, bud, but “it doesn’t work that way.”

In the 1950s, these kinds of jobs may have offered the security and pensions that people sought — considering the other options. Not sure what options you’re talking about, but considering families were supported and bills were paid from these kinds of jobs, I can see where they got that crazy notion of security and pensions they sought. The security was waking the fuck up and showing up for work. The oh-so-elusive pensions are still sought after today, but have been replaced by SSI for all the baby boomers who thought like you do and failed to save. Today, Americans have easier access to education and far more vocational diversity. There is no need romanticize a far less dynamic time in American history. Easier access to what education? 17th Century Lesbian Dance Theory may have easy access with predatory lending by our govt in the form of non bankrupt able student loans, but I’d hardly argue that better prepares them to get a job. And as for romantic notions, the work done in the 50’s set the stage for the introduction of the number one muscle car in the US, prepared the US for space flight to the moon, defined a standard of living that people are still chasing after to this day, and did so affordably, and paved the way for culture that would define America for the next 50 years. (Prom, drive-ins, cars, music, owning a home, technology, TV business, the importance of education, etc.) The only more dynamic time might have been roaring 20’s or the first flight of man. 

Evidently, presidential candidates have no problem imagining a future where other people’s grandchildren toil on assembly lines slapping together cheap toys or solar panels. I have no problem imagining it either. Do I want it for my kid? No. That’s why I parented right and stressed education, the right kind of education. (i.e. something marketable) But I also know that some parents are fuck ups, or some kids don’t listen. Thus there will be a ready supply of kids who told their parents to fuck off and flunked out of school, got pregnant in their teens and couldn’t finish school, or broke laws and went to prison and need any job to start re-builiding their life. I have no problem imagining a future where yes, these people would prefer to provide for their families with dignity, and climb out of poverty even if it meant “assembly lines slapping together cheap toys and solar panels.” When you buy your kids bullshit toys for Christmas or invested in fake subsidized technology, if I could help another family here at home rather than support one overseas when we have needy here, yeah I have no problem envisioning a future where anybody that wanted a job had the opportunity to work and earn a living. None of them will say, “When elected president I will make it a top priority to create more underpaid busywork for all Americans!” Yet, that’s exactly the sort of counterproductive policies they typically propose, and the kind voters tend to gravitate towards. Wow, this guy must have been spoiled. I bet it felt good to think up this shit on the backs of his father and grandfather’s work.

When politicians says we’ve outsourced manufacturing jobs, they mean the labor has become too expensive. Here we actually agree, sometimes. Most voters probably understand that China, Mexico, Malaysia, “steal” jobs because American workers can’t compete with someone making a dollar an hour. Also true, thus if I am going to charge more for a product, there must be a definitive value increase as well. (See Previous Post) The result is that consumers may enjoy lower prices and, theoretically, should be moving on to more rewarding and higher paying work. There’s the danger in this, that word theoretically. This is the way its supposed to work in his head, not how it really works in life. Instead, liberals and right-wing populists, promise to save those jobs: They do so by supporting artificially raising wages. I fail to see how artificial wage raise saves jobs, but then again I’m not a right wing populist or a liberal. By opposing free trade agreements to protect those artificially high wages. I’m all for free trade. But how is it not free to allow any company to do business as they like, but impose a tariff on companies who artificially lower their wages by altering their currency? You just preached against artificial wage affect, but now are denouncing Trump’s plan to rid artificial wage affect via a tariff that targets only those nations that take advantage of how dumb we are. By rescuing companies and industries that refuse to innovate or subsidizing those that agree to make things no one really needsUmmm, define the products being made that are being subsidized that no one needs? I’m not a fan of subsidies at all, but what products are you referring to? No one needs corn in their gas, but its subsidized. No one needs a cell phone or internet access but we subsidize that too. 

But even the above agenda can’t really stop progress. You sound liberal, define progress. Like when a man can’t change a tire or oil? When politicians contend that manufacturing jobs have “vanished,” they mean that advances have been made that make certain manufacturing jobs highly productive — necessitating fewer workers — and others completely obsolete. Sometimes yes. I will grant you, the horse buggy wheel is not in high demand, thus horse buggy wheel manufacturers are damn near obsolete. However, when the jobs do not disappear, the simply re-locate to somewhere union-less and with better tax policy, they aren’t exactly obsolete, now are they?

Fact: robots are better than humans at assembling things. True. In 1975, nearly 30 percent of Americans worked in the manufacturing sector. By 2010, it was only around nine percent. During that time, the GDP tripled and productivity soared, in part, due to automation. Robots don’t get hurt. They don’t have pensions. They rarely make any mistakes. They don’t take vacations. They don’t join unions. Their cost continues to drop. And robots are definitely not going to uninvent themselves. True, but they will inevitably break down, need maintenance and repair, and need programming. Higher paying and specialized? Sure to your point. But several of the issues you mention here that drove them to the machines were demanded by unions. I do not endorse or defend unions. Fair point.

This kind of transformation happens to the economy at all times in various forms. A century ago almost 50 percent of Americans made their living in agriculture. One farmer fed around seven people. Even in the 1980s, a cultural movement emerged to romanticize the plight of the small farmer, who was already often subsisting on welfare. But 30 years later, only two percent of the American workforce works in agriculture, while productive it up thirtyfold. Your numbers are skewed. Your sentence says 50% of Americans made their living in ag….30 yrs later only 2% of Americans work in ag….what percentage was foreign? Illegal? Working for a third of the American? Without this number, your assertion that productivity is 30 times more with a workforce depleted by 48% is a pipe dream. My company would love to see how you made that happen, numbers boy.

When we have presidents who blame ATM machines and other efficiencies for unemployment and a Republican frontrunner who argues the country must be hermetically sealed from competition, Hermetically sealed? Which candidate openly endorsed this? BTW, hermetically sealed means welded shut. Your use of the term is improper granted that it is impossible, not to mention false. We don’t blame ATM machines, we blame automated answering services for a lack of true customer service and un-Godly hold times. that tells us, as always, there’s a deep-seated suspicion of innovation. Many experts argue that Americans living in 2015 face a unique set circumstances that prohibit them from recovering from the ravages of creative destruction. Mainly, so many educated people like yourself that no so much that isn’t so. Experts claim that one in three jobs will be taken by software or robots by 2025 and that by 2030 as much as 90 percent of jobs will be at risk of replacementYou’re right, so fuck it, everybody sit down and nobody go to work, because were all just obsolete, right?

If experts excel at anything, it’s being awful at the prediction business. Yourself included asshole. We have no clue what new industry will emerge a decade from now. True. The more we innovate, though, the more it seems we need human creativity and ingenuity — at least until the post-scarcity world of singularity. Relevance? Certainly, there’s no guarantee our skills will remain viable in perpetuity; not in a world where an advance can decimate entire industries in a few years. True and thus its an individual responsibility to make themselves marketable in the workforce. In the real world, we get this. Yet, in the political world, we continue to vote for a bunch of Luddites who believe America greatness is contingent on reinstating an antiquated factory-based economy. We also value education so highly that we blindly throw money at anything a kid with no credit history or proven work history wants to borrow money to major in, including whatever in the fuck you got a  bullshit degree in in some sad college somewhere. 

What a pretentious little shit. Only a spoiled brat blessed by the work of someone else and the grace of God could be this cocky. 

rooster
Arrogant and Proud, without a care in the world as to where all that corn he ate came from and how that nice coop that covered his ass in the rain got there. Completely and utterly clueless. 
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One thought on “Pretentious Cock

  1. If we boiled it down our sole existence depends on the farmers who grow our food and the truck divers who deliver it to us. Neither of those can be automated. Sure we use machinery to help perform the work but nothing can replace them. My dad used to say that every young man should be required to serve at least 2 yrs. in some form of military. I believe everyone should be required to work on a farm and get an understanding of what is required for the human race to exist. Get off that high horse and get their hands dirty so maybe then they will understand that almost all forms of employment are necessary. For instance, an engine cannot function properly if each part is not in its place.

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